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tv   BBC Newsroom Live  BBC News  September 21, 2017 11:00am-1:00pm BST

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when a this is bbc news, and these are the top stories developing at ham. rescue workers in mexico city work around the 11am. rescue workers in mexico city work around the clock to free children trapped in the rubble of a collapsed primary school. mexico requests specialist teams and equipment from other countries to help in the search was by this. the cabinet meets in downing street, ahead of a major speech in brexit to be delivered by the prime minister in italy tomorrow. puerto rico cut—off without power, after the island was battered by hurricane maria. reports of catastrophic flooding. police investigating the bomb attack on a tube train arrest a sixth person in south london. also, the fa under fire for its handling of allegations surrounding mark sampson. the england women's manager was sacked last night over claims of inappropriate behaviour with female players that were detailed in a report for the fa two years ago. the
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ryanair boss, michael o'leary, admits significant management failure, as it struggles to cope with flight failure, as it struggles to cope with flight cancellations. and three yea rs with flight cancellations. and three years after prince harry founded the invictus games, the uk's biggest tea m invictus games, the uk's biggest team yet is preparing to fly to canada to compete. brendan rogers hello, good morning, it is thursday 21st october. i am annita mcveigh, welcome to bbc newsroom live. rescuers in mexico are working equates the clock to find survivors after a huge earthquake caused widespread damage in the capital, mexico city, and in surrounding areas on tuesday. more than 230 people were killed, including more than 20 children, who died when their primary school collapsed. 30
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children are still missing and the death toll is expected to rise. the epicentre of the earthquake was about 17 five miles from the capital. the earthquake struck on the anniversary of weeks ago's west ever quake in 1985. the president has declared three days of morning for the victims. our correspondent ports. after the horror of the earthquake, there is hope is that these young children were pulled alive from the rubble of the primary school in the south of mexico city. rescuers searched overnight for others who may still be trapped. at least 20 children were killed here. it was on tuesday lunchtime that the powerful earthquake struck mexico. across mexico city, the search for survivors is continuing.
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as you can see, people are going in to try and help the assets. this six storey building in the distance is the focus of their work. this family's son, juan, was working in the building and to the pastor they have watched as rescuers picked through the rubble, but there are still no sign of him. translation: we still believe he will make it out alive. i will dig him out myself if i can. relief workers have beenjoined by hundreds of volunteers. many have turned up with their own tools to do their bit. there are a lot of people in the buildings, that's the problem, lots of people are trapped on the buildings, and that is something, it
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is desperate, because nobody is helping. at times, the crowd was asked to be silent so rescuers could call out to any survivors still stuck under the debris. more than 20 people have been rescued already from this building, but as time passes, the chances of people being reunited with their loved ones are becoming ever slimmer. jesus daza lives near the primary school which collapsed in mexico city, and saw a tower collapsing across the road when the earthquake hit. he told the victoria derbyshire programme that the efforts of everyone in the community were focused on rescuing the trapped children. iam about i am about ten minutes away from the school that collapsed, and actually i know a couple of friends who were helping out, trying to remove all the daybreak, to rescue all these kids. they said that they were around 100 kids at the moment of the
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quake when the building just almost com pletely quake when the building just almost completely collapsed. we have seen, basically, around the news and around the social media, all the photographs of hundreds of people helping out. hundreds of policemen, firefighters, members of rescue teams who are there, and actually just a few hours ago, i was looking out on social media that even maybe some of the construction that is still on, it may collapse even more. so we are all suffering from watching all of the images that we cannot believe that inside this building there is almost complete collapse. there are still some children inside. even though we are
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concerned, these are kids we don't even know, but we are just concerned about our people, and it is really sad to see this situation going on. and what's happening right now? i mean, obviously the rescue workers are still there, trying to see if they can pull any survivors out of they can pull any survivors out of the rubble, but presumably as well be blah too frightened to return to their homes, if you are saying there is concern more people might collapse. are you literally seeing people sleep on the streets? well, actually there are some shelters just around the city. there are lots of places for people to stay, actually people here in mexico city have been really nice with each other. they have set up lots of places, not just the other. they have set up lots of places, notjust the shelters, but also people are opening up their homes, their own apartments, so that people who have lost their homes, or
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people who have lost their homes, or people that cannot come back to their own places because they might collapse, i guess that some people arejust collapse, i guess that some people are just saying, if you don't have a place to stay, i can offer you my own home or my place to stay, i can offer you my own home 01’ my own place to stay, i can offer you my own home or my own apartment, which is something amazing i think. we will have much more for you on the rescue efforts in mexico throughout bbc newsroom live. theresa may will chair a meeting of her cabinet this morning to discuss a major speech on brexit which she will deliver in italy tomorrow. the prime minister has insisted that the government is working together to get the best deal for britain — despite the foreign secretary, boris johnson, setting out his own vision for brexit in a recent newspaper article. chris mason is in downing street. good morning to you, chris. will this be about theresa may saying to the cabinet, the ink is effectively
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dry on her speech, or will she be still open to suggestions for changes, perhaps? that is a very good question, and the honest answer isi good question, and the honest answer is i don't know, but suffice to say, we do know from the last week yes, there are clearly tensions around there are clearly tensions around the cabinet table about the exact tone and thrust and detail going into the speech. what else do we know? we know a draft has been circulating, there was a snap taken of olly raynor and is, the now former senior civil servant, holding that the draft as he walked up the street around a week ago. we know that borisjohnson, the foreign secretary, had seen a draft of the speech, prior to his intervention on saturday. we don't know is the extent to which to go back to the reference of the ink, whether the ink is still being spilt, as far as the speech is concerned whether the cabinet has been presented this morning with final text. what we
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also know, to stick to the core fa cts , also know, to stick to the core facts, nick of former chief of staff, joint chiefs of staff, writing in the telegraph, again that same newspaper, suggesting not only was borisjohnson same newspaper, suggesting not only was boris johnson making same newspaper, suggesting not only was borisjohnson making the marks publicly that we are a little distant from the official government line, but suggesting that philip hammond had been on manoeuvres. as opposed to boris johnson hammond had been on manoeuvres. as opposed to borisjohnson saying pretty much the opposite. what sort of speech will it take at least until theresa may delivers it tomorrow? it will take a suspect a lot of trying to keep as many people on board as possible, because on the one hand theresa may has the persuasionjob around one hand theresa may has the persuasion job around the cabinet table right now, that meeting by the way has been under way for an hour
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and ten minutes. in the speech tomorrow, she has another audience tomorrow, she has another audience to talk to, and that is the european union. and the remaining 27 member states. we have reported over the summer with these ongoing rounds of negotiations, we have had three between david davis and michel barnier, not a lot of progress. she is hoping that can act as an unblock if you like to the lack of progress in brussels by saying enough to convince brussels there should be progress in these talks, but at the same time not showing —— saying so much that there are those around the cabinet table uncomfortable with what she has to say. so very tricky for the prime minister to please both audiences at the same time. for the moment, factory much, chris mason in downing street. the caribbean island of puerto rico is without power and under night—time curfew as it struggles
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to deal with the aftermath of hurricane maria, the most powerful storm to hit the us territory in nearly a century. as maria moves away from puerto rico, the us national hurricane centre has given a warning that the storm could regain major hurricane status as it skirts past the dominican republic and heads towards the bahamas. the entire island of puerto rico is also under flood warning, with the storm predicted to dump over 50cm of rain over the next 2a hours. our correspondent will grant is in puerro rico. it turned out to be the most powerful storm to hit puerto rico in almost a century. and it really felt like that. all of the people hunkered down, whether it was in the shelter, in their homes, they would have heard the most incredible sound of the wind and rain lashing down. that lasted for several hours.
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what we are seeing now are the last vestiges of the storm as it makes its way off the territory of puerto rico and back out into the caribbean. there is an overnight curfew put in place by the governor. that'll be in place for several days partly to protect people from themselves. there are many accidents that can happen in the dark while the electricity is out. there are many electric cables down. expect widespread flooding for remote regions. thankfully, there have been no reports of large—scale loss of life. detectives investigating last week's terror attack on a london underground train at parsons green tube station have arrested a sixth person. a 17—year—old boy was detained in thornton heath, in south london, just after midnight. the five other people in custody are all men,
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aged between 18 and 48—years old. matthew thompson is at southwark police station in london for us. matthew, tell us if you would about this latest arrest, and about the general progress of the investigation. as you can see behind me, southwark police station is where we believe all six of them in so far arrested in this case are being held by police under section 41 of the terrorism act. it is worth taking a moment to explain exactly what that means. the terrorism act came into force in 2001, and it allows people to be arrested on suspicion of acts of terrorism for an initial period of 48 hours, and then they can appeal to the courts to have that extended. in this case, police have been granted the right to hold one of the men, yaya toure, until today, at which point they have to either charge him, releasing or applied at the period extended further. and —— a man named tom one.
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since those arrests, police have announced they have arrested four further men, on tuesday a 25—year—old man in newport, south wales, and early on wednesday morning the arrested further a 30 rolled and a 48—year—old both in newport, south wales. this morning as you were saying, police have announced they have arrested further person, a 17 boy informed and heath, they say searches are ongoing at an address in that area, which takes the total to six addresses searched by police in this case, though we know the one of those cases is a chicken shop in hounslow no longer under active search. given the nature of those powers i was describing, it may be several more days before we hear any news of charges. we might not hear anything at all. you might run but after the manchester attacks there were up to 20 or more people arrested and none
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of them were subsequently arrested dodt charged. we will bring you any more updates as and when we get them. marty jopson. now the headlines full stop rescue teams in mexico looking to free a number of people thought to be still alive under the rubble of a school which collapsed on tuesday's f greg. —— tuesday's earthquake. the chief executive of rya nair, —— tuesday's earthquake. the chief executive of ryanair, michael o'leary, admits there has been a significant management failure as the firm struggles to cope with thousands of flight cancellations. in sport, mp damian collins says the systems and place at the fa are flawed and has called for an independent review after the sacking of england women's head coach, mark sanson. in 2015, the fa decided sampson was not a safeguarding
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threat, however he was dismissed yesterday for what the fa called inappropriate and unacceptable behaviour in a previous role. marcus rashford scored twice for manchester united last night as the holders reached the fourth round of the league cup with a win over burton albion. chris froome says he has no regrets about a bronze medal in the time trial at the road world championships in norway. he called ita championships in norway. he called it a long and amazing season. i will be back with more on those stories just after half past. the football association is facing heavy criticism following the sacking of england women's manager mark sampson. the sports minister, tracey crouch, has described the situation as a mess after sampson was sacked for what the fa called his "inappropriate behaviour" during a previous coaching job in bristol. richard main reports. from 6—0 to the sack in less than 24
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hours. one day after seeing his england team win in emphatic style, manager mark sanson finally england team win in emphatic style, manager mark sa nson finally lost england team win in emphatic style, manager mark sanson finally lost his job yesterday evening after weeks of controversy. the fa confirmed they had terminated his contract, due to safeguarding allegations made against him when he was a coach at bristol academy, prior to taking the job. the governing body said the full details of the 2014 investigation into what they called inappropriate and unacceptable behaviour with female players only came to their attention last week. the issue became one of mark's conduct, and this is really around the boundaries between a player and a coach, the coach in this place —— case, coaching players. on reading that report, i felt that what i saw was incompatible with the standards you expect someone to work in the fa. despite sacking him, the fa say sanson does fa. despite sacking him, the fa say sa nson does not fa. despite sacking him, the fa say sanson does not pose a safeguarding risk working in the game, but the government wants answers. with the
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sports minister tracey crouch saying the situation is a mess. the fa has defended its handling of the crisis, but officials will be put on the spot again next month as a committee of mps ask how things could go so wrong once again at the top of the national game. the timing of this is very odd. how significant is the chronology? highly significant. mark sampson was appointed in 2013, the allegations that came against him from his time at worcester academy where he was previously came a few months after in early 2014. and investigation and went away, that reported back in
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march 20 15. went away, that reported back in march 2015. but the chief executive, martin glenn, as you heard in the report, talking about how he only discovered the existence of the report in october 20 15. there are questions about why he didn't have greater curiosity about the contents of that. we are talking about a very senior member of the fa, the head coach of the women's team, safeguarding allegations were made, martin glenn said he took it on face value the report was confidential and didn't look until last wednesday when two anonymous people came to him, we don't know their identity, and said you should look at this again. they did. mark sanson has gone. serious questions for the fa about that report and why it wasn't looked into further when they had sight of it. not the first time that serious questions have been raised over the fa's procedures for handling incidents of this nature, or questions over safeguarding and so on. how much pressure on the fa now because of
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this? i think there is a degree, because lots of people still have questions over that timing, over that lack of curiosity about what was in the report. this comes of course off the back of weeks of pressure on the fa and on mark sampson. there were two separate enquiries into mark sanson's conduct, allegations he had made racist remarks to two players. those enquiries cleared him but nevertheless we understand in quarries are set to be reopened this week on the basis of fresh evidence. i put it to martin glenn yesterday that this was a very convenient time and way to get rid of mark sanson, given the ongoing pressure of his position. he dismissed that and said it was two separate issues, mere coincidence, and the fa had to have high standards. when was brought to his attention he took the decision to dismiss mark sanson, but that timing and that lag of being made aware of the existence of the report in october 2016, and making the
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decision this week, that will continue to be examined and i think it will lead to continued scrutiny of the fa over this issue. think it very much. the chief executive of ryanair, michael leary, has admitted serious management failure as it struggles to cope with hundreds of flight struggles to cope with hundreds of flight cancellations. a group of ryanair pilots has rejected an offer of cash bonuses of up to 12—thousand pounds to work extra shifts, and help reduce cancellations. mike cartwright is at stansted airport, a pretty unusual situation to have michael o'leary, the chief executive of any airline, admitting toa executive of any airline, admitting to a significant management failure like this. but tell us more about why the pilots have rejected this bonus in favour of a new contract negotiations? we have heard the
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comments of michael leary from the agm. before this comedic scribe this whole situation as a mess. how do you get out of the mess? perhaps you offer a one—off payment, a cash bonus for the extra hour. what he has done is offered £12,000 to pilots, £6,000 to first attendance. but what it seems that the representatives from 18 of the airports out of 80 or so of ryanair‘s across europe have come out and said come no, we are not going to accept this. this is an opportunity for them to negotiate. they say the market is changing and pilots should work differently with management. they are saying, look, people are leaving for greener pastures, new contracts is the a nswer to pastures, new contracts is the answer to keep people at ryanair. now of course we heard michael o'leary come out at the beginning of the week and say, look, we haven't got a shortage of pilots, but we do know that around 140 or so of pilots have left in recent months to go and
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work their opposition. just briefly, give us an idea of the impact this is having, i think we will go back to mark kite right, that is our next guest, an aviation expert, but mike, you are back with us. give us an idea on the ground of how this is affecting passengers. hugely. 2100 flights, 350,000 passengers. just give you a flavour here. this is this is rya nair's give you a flavour here. this is this is ryanair‘s uk hub, 70% of the flight this is ryanair‘s uk hub, 70% of the flight in and out of here belong to ryanair. today, flight in and out of here belong to rya nair. today, 19 flight in and out of here belong to ryanair. today, 19 flights in and out have been cancelled to destinations like lisbon, marseille, luxembourg, eindhoven and many more. now what we know is that all the customers who have been affected have been sent a text or an e—mail, telling them that their flight has been cancelled. they are being directed to rya nair's been cancelled. they are being directed to ryanair‘s website. on the website, it says they can haven't refund or a replacement flight. haven't refund or a replacement flight. but consumer groups are
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coming out, and they are considered —— they are criticising ryanair, because they say on the website there is no mention of compensation. passengers are entitled to compensation, around £250 for a flight compensation, around £250 for a flight around 1500 kilometres, more if the flight is longer. also, in today's papers, criticism that passengers who have tried to rebook our having to pay for the extras again, things like extra luggage, extra legroom and so on. we can speak tojulian bray, aviation expert. as mike was saying, the ryanair do you sense it is another charity
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for pilots to work on a new contract, rather than accept this cash bonus michael o'leary is offering? just talk to us about why or how the terms and conditions for ryanair pilots differ to those that other airlines? good morning. quite simply, what is happening is that you have a situation where ryanair pilots are mainly self—employed. they are on personal service contracts. and rya nair they are on personal service contracts. and ryanair is seen as a good entry to the aviation industry, and quite often pilots will move on. however, michael o'leary did say that, yes, pilots have left, but in turn they have also been recruiting pilots from other airlines. and so the shortfall in pilotage, if you like, isn't as great as the unions and the associations are making out. now, the association see this as the ideal time to change the whole ethos of recruitment at ryanair. well, i don't think the management is so far
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biting. that there is an opportunity, nonetheless, as i suggested in that first comment, to exert some leverage over the company with this? 0h, exert some leverage over the company with this? oh, yes. what mr o'leary is trying to do, he is actually offering, they are not bonus payments, but more like golden handcuffs, because the money will not be paid out until november next year, and they have to complete a set number of hours before they actually qualify. but what he is trying to do is actually buy back this block of four weeks that is pa rt this block of four weeks that is part of the initial deal, because as you have probably realised, all of the leave period has been translated into a shorter period, so it means that all the pilots are putting in their leave applications at the same time. is the also trying to buy back goodwill, effectively?” time. is the also trying to buy back goodwill, effectively? ithink that has gone out the window frankly, because it is way beyond a pr disaster, this is a major operational disaster he is trying to correct. not so much goodwill, this
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comes down to a hard—nosed commercial proposition, and that is how mr o'leary has always dealt with everybody. you need to negotiate with him and be very aware of what he is offering. in a slightly longer term, how much commercial damage is this going to do the ryanair, in your opinion? well, the shares were slightly off, but they recovered, and let's face it, it is the difference between paying say £29 for a flight and £250. so what are you going to do? once we get over this little difficulty, and the winter schedules are back in, which means of course less flights and plenty of pilots to service them, then of course everybody will flock back to ryanair. they might not flying —— like flying via line but they certainly like their prices. thank you very much. clinical some
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of today's other developing stories. nine in 10 gp surgeries in england have been rated as good or outstanding by inspectors. it means general practice is the highest performing sector in the nhs, according to the care quality commission ‘s ratings, but hospitals, mental health and social care. but concerns were flagged up at one in seven practices. more than nine million motorists are still using their hand—held to 6 points and a £200 fine. the motoring organisation says using mobiles illegally is now the number one concern amongst drivers. doctors and relatives of patients,
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they will no longer have to go through a long winded legal process to get permission. people wanting to give up smoking are being officially advised to try e—cigarettes — despite a lack of evidence about their long term effects. public health england is including e—cigarettes in its annual "stop—smoking" campaign for the first time — it says they can be one of the most successful means of quitting smoking. jenny walrond reports. over1 million people have used the stoptober challenge to quit smoking. this campaign has inspired over 1.5 million attempts to quit smoking since it started five years ago. the number of people successfully quitting is at the highest for at least a decade. success rates for people on the lowest incomes has gone up as well. that may be down to e—cigarettes. more than half of smokers turn to e—cigarettes when they want to quit. this year, for the first time, public health england will use the stoptober campaign to recommend
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people try e—cigarettes if they have struggled to give up in the past. experts admit it is not without risk but is significantly less harmful. they don't contain many of the nasty products in tobacco. they are about 95% less harmful than tobacco smoke. having said that, we all acknowledge that longer term research is needed. the number of people who smoke has steadily dropped in recent years, but it is still the main cause of preventable death in the uk. while experts acknowledge there is little evidence of the long—term benefits or harms of vaping, smokers are being advised they are more likely to quit if they combine e—cigarettes with local stop smoking services. it is time for the weather with
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simon. good morning. we have had some heavy rain across the western parts of the uk. the scene there are not great in shropshire area. the rain is moving to the east and it will clear western parts. they could be some showers across northern ireland, turning heavy and sundry. ahead of the rain in east anglia and the south—east, it should remain dry into the evening. but elsewhere, it will feel fresher during the afternoon despite the sunshine. tonight the rain clears. it will turn chillier than it has done in previous nights. temperatures in the countryside getting down to four and five celsius. friday is dry and bright from any. more rain spreading through northern ireland, scotland,
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north—west england and wales, and the south of england. this is bbc newsroom live. the headlines: rescue workers in mexico city continue to search for trapped children in the rubble of a collapsed primary school following tuesday's earthquake. the cabinet is meeting in downing street ahead of an important brexit speech the prime minister will deliver in florence tomorrow. ryanair minister will deliver in florence tomorrow. rya nair boss minister will deliver in florence tomorrow. ryanair boss michael o'leary has admitted to significant management failure as the airline cancels 40 to 50 flights a day for the next five to six weeks. a sixth person has been arrested in connection with the london tube bomb atan connection with the london tube bomb at an address in south london. the whole of prce ricco has been left without power following the catastrophic damage caused by hurricane maria. —— puerto rico.
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three years after prince harry found the invictus games, uk team is flying to canada to compete. let's ta ke let's take a look at the sport now. we canjoin let's take a look at the sport now. we can join hugh. let's take a look at the sport now. we canjoin hugh. good morning. mp damian collins has called for an independent review into the football association's handling of the role and dismissal of former england women's head coach mark sampson. he was sacked yesterday for inappropriate and unacceptable behaviour with female players in a previous role. the fa's processors have come under the microscope. mark sampson was cleared to continue working in football. however, having
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being urged to re—examine the details last week, years later, fa chief executive martin glenn said the board chose to dismiss samsung yesterday. he had faced separate claims of bullying and discrimination made by eniola aluko. earlier i spoke to richard conway. there will be questions asked about the nature of the bureaucratic processes within the fa, about why the chief executive didn't look further into this claim. and why as well it took until last wednesday for him to look at this, this claim. i put it to martin glenn yesterday that this was perhaps very convenient timing giving the enquiries into any luco. he denied that and said there are separate issues. that the fa had to be seen to be doing the right thing. this episode reflects badly on the structure and governance of the fa. people would say, i was it that
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someone like mark sampson could have taken up thejob someone like mark sampson could have taken up the job of england manager when the fa had information within their grasp which, when it became fully known, murrin —— meant mark sampson could not continue. how was he appointed? who signed off on that? why was he able to continue in that? why was he able to continue in thatjob for so long that? why was he able to continue in that job for so long before the leadership of the football association called up that evidence to look at it fully and decided to let him go? england take on the west indies in trent bridge injust england take on the west indies in trent bridge in just under england take on the west indies in trent bridge injust under an hour in the second one day international of their five match series. england eased to victory on tuesday in the first match. jonny bairstow hit a century. england selectors will name their test team for the ashes towards the end of next week, with huge question marks remaining over places in the batting line—up. huge question marks remaining over places in the batting line—upm huge question marks remaining over places in the batting line-up. it is not ideal. you would want to go straight in knowing your best 11. i don't think we are quite there at the moment. although the guys who
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played this summer showed glimpses of what they are capable of. we went there in 2013—2014 with a settled batting line—up and got beaten 5—0. wright the tantalising prospect of roger federer and rafa nadal teeming up roger federer and rafa nadal teeming up as doubles partners may happen in prague this weekend. the labour couple see six of europe's best players take on six of their cou nterpa rts players take on six of their counterparts from the rest of the world. the teams will play singles and doubles matches in the exhibition event. i'm very happy he is on my side. i played a lot against rafa on so many occasions in big matches. finally to have him on my side, it's a joy. we talked about playing doubles a long, long time ago. it never happened. of course i would love to share the other side of the net with him. we have to see
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how practice goes. at the end, bjorn will take the ultimate decision. some breaking cycling news. brian cookson has lost the election for the uci presidency by 37 votes to eight. more on that later. that is all the sport for now. thank you. theresa may's speech on brexit in italy tomorrow will represent an "open and generous offer" to the rest of the eu, a cabinet minister has told the bbc. it is thought that might include a guarantee that no eu country would lose out from changes to the eu's current budget as a result of the uk leaving. mrs may is briefing her cabinet this morning about her upcoming speech. we can now speak to james forsyth, political editor at the spectator, who joins me from westminster. good morning. in your latest article you write that it is imperative that theresa may no pics what sort of brexit she wants. in the speech that
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she is going to be making this morning to cabinet, will she be able to bring everybody along?|j morning to cabinet, will she be able to bring everybody along? i think she will be able to bring everybody along with her on the proposal on transitional terms. i don't think the speech will give us that much more detail on what he envisages the final relationship between britain and the eu being at the end of the negotiations. it will presumably give some hints about the direction of travel? i think it will be very clear on the transition. i think there is an ongoing cabinet debate about what the end state of british and eu relations will be after brexit. much time does she have before she has two come down on the kind of brexit she wants? she will not be keeping everybody happy in the cabinet because some people clearly wa nt the cabinet because some people clearly want a harder form of brexit, some people want a softer one? she has to pics soon. michel
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barnier is right. the clock is ticking. there is only 18 months until the article 50 process comes to an end. she needs to get her cabinet to sit down and have an honest and frank discussion about what the trade—offs are and what they are prepared to accept. so could we see a new, even more difficult chapter, if you like, in the brexit sager at that point? yes. that is when the rubber is going to hit the road. she will have to choose ultimately. that will disappoint some people in her cabinet. in terms of today, what insights do you have about this cabinet meeting and whether she is presenting the florence speech to her cabinet today as a fate compleat, or whether she will have been open in this meeting today to new suggestions even at this late stage? i don't think they will be radically rewriting the speech. it
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has been squared away with senior members of the cabinet on the transitional terms they are going to offer to the eu. one of the interesting things is how many members of the cabinet are not that much more abreast of what the thinking on brexit is in number 10 than the rest of us. james forsyth, thank you. let's head over to downing street and two chris mason. is that cabinet meeting about to break up? we think it might be. you can see the shot of the door. we have been waiting here for one hour and 40 minutes. we wait. i think this counts as a rather long cabinet meeting by the usual length of the genre. put back by a couple of days. it normally happens on a tuesday morning. but the prime minister was in the united states at the united
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nations. but here, the big discussion all about florence and that speech tomorrow. drivers for the various cabinet ministers very clear from around whitehall have returned to their cars in the last five minutes. so we think that the meeting may be about to wrap up and conclude. when it does, we will try and bring you the flavour of the questions that we showed in the direction of cabinet ministers, although i suspect they will be pretty keen to remain pretty tight—lipped. i suspect we won't get a briefing until tomorrow. what is most important for a theresa may as people emerge from this meeting in the short period between now and when she does make the speech, is that there is an army —— image of absolute unity. she doesn't want anybody else setting out their version of brexit in the next
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24—hour is, does she? version of brexit in the next 24-hour is, does she? that is a fair assumption. it doesn't look like that door is going to open. we got an inside this morning in the daily telegraph for the second time in a week of the frustration from those within the conservative party family of the noises off within the cabinet. notjust of the noises off within the cabinet. not just from of the noises off within the cabinet. notjust from boris johnson, but nick timothy, the former chief of staff to theresa may, riding in the telegraph this morning that he was frustrated by the manoeuvres of philip hammond, the manoeuvres of philip hammond, the chancellor, articulating a different position from the foreign secretary and arguing that the brexit deal should keep the uk as close to the european union as possible. borisjohnson was articulating a rather different position. for the prime minister the challenge to square the circle between mr hammond and mrjohnson, while having something substantial to say in florence tomorrow, that it can act as a catalyst to kick on
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those negotiations between the british government and michel barnier, the eu chief negotiator. chris, thank you. mexico has asked other countries to provide specialist teams and equipment to help search for survivors after the devastating earthquake on tuesday, in which at least 230 people were killed. in mexico city, emergency workers are still trying to reach people trapped under the rubble of a school, where 21 children and five adults are known to have died. david pena was in the epicentre of the earthquake in puebla when it struck. he said he could hear the ground underneath him rumbling as it moved. it literally hit in the face. you don't expect that. you're doing your normal routine. after that you feel a little dizzy. is this happening? after a few seconds, everything was
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moving, you cannot walk. your pictures are coming off the walls. what is really impressive is just the sound of the ground makes. hitting rocks. it is basically like you are in the middle —— in the sea in the middle of the city. you are in puebla, the epicentre of the quake. if you go outside now what can you see? notjust the buildings, but presumably there are people? definitely. right now, downtown puebla is not accessible. normally you will find a city of 6 million people. in downtown puebla at least 2 million people live there. now it is not accessible. you can see all buildings and churches, built in the 1500, with bell tower
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is completely in half. debris on the floor. people just walking is completely in half. debris on the floor. peoplejust walking on is completely in half. debris on the floor. people just walking on the streets, rocks falling over them. it is completely surreal. an inquest into the death of moors murderer ian brady found he died of natural causes. he died in a secure hospital in merseyside in may. katie sweeting is at bootle town hall. describe what happened there today? as you say, the coroner, christopher sumner, recorded a verdict of death by natural causes. brady had heart failure, secondary to chronic lung disease. he had been a heavy smoker right until 2008, when the smoking ban came into force. he died at the age of 79 in ashworth psychiatric hospital, where he had been for more than 30 years. he had been on intermittent hunger strike since
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1999, and force—fed for some of that time. he had a feeding tube until the last few days of his life. he had been fighting for many of those yea rs had been fighting for many of those years to be moved to a hospital in scotla nd years to be moved to a hospital in scotland where he might be allowed to die. but that request was never granted. we heard today from two doctors, doctor brian rogers, a co nsulta nt doctors, doctor brian rogers, a consultant forensic and home office pathologist, who carried out the postmortem. he concluded, as well as confirming the causes of death, that brady was in good condition, his body was in good condition, his bmi was good, he weighed about nine stone. he wasn't emaciated. he concluded he had good treatment in hospital. we then heard from another doctor, a consultant forensic psychiatrist with mersey care, and he said brady had been accepting intermittent food from various carers, sometimes meals, sometimes snacks, which kept him at a relatively healthy weight. one of the things which was hoped would
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come out today was what had been done with brady's body. that has not been confirmed. the coroner said thatis been confirmed. the coroner said that is down to his lawyer, who is currently on a religious holiday. myra hindley, who carried out those murders with brady, died in 2002 in prison. her ashes were scattered in a secret location by a prison officer without any gravestone or markings. it is not yet known what happened to brady's remains. thank you. in a moment, a summary of the business news. but first, the headlines. rescue teams in mexico city worked to free a number of people thought to be still alive under the rubble of a school which collapsed in tuesday's earthquake. the cabinet meets in downing street ahead of a major speech on brexit to be delivered by the prime minister in italy tomorrow. the chief executive of rya nair, in italy tomorrow. the chief executive of ryanair, michael o'leary, admits there has been a significant management failure as the firm struggles to cope with this
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thousands of flight cancellations. hello, i'm ben thompson. the top business stories. the gap between what the government owns and what it spends felled by 18% last month. —— fell. economists had been expecting the gap to be wider but the numbers we re the gap to be wider but the numbers were bruised by vat receipts. consumers are being advised to stop buying fridges and freezers with flammable plastic backs, which could create a fire risk. research by consumer group which? says there are 236 such models on sale, representing nearly half the market. it's asking manufacturers to stop making them. the co—op bank is in new hands, after the co—op group sold its final 1% stake. co—op still retains its insurance, funeral services and supermarket business but sold its remaining stake in the bank for £5 million as part of a refinancing deal. good morning. of the uk posted
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better—than—expected deficit figures for august, according to the latest data from the office for national statistics. the deficit, the difference between what the government makes in revenue, usually via tax, and what it spends on things like public services. the gap in august fell by 18% to £57 billion. economists had been expecting that gap to be wider. but it was boosted by good vat returns, even though there was a falling corporation tax receipts. what will it mean for philip hammond, the chancellor, as he prepares for the budget? vicky pryce is chief economist. what do you make of these figures? an unexpected fall. economist. what do you make of these figures? an unexpected fallm economist. what do you make of these figures? an unexpected fall. it is good news. when philip hammond put his budget together he has a little
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bit more room to manoeuvre. one of his physical targets —— fiscal targets is to see it being less than gdp at some point. we are more or less at that level. he could do a number of things in november. either ina number of number of things in november. either in a number of areas. he has issues with housing infrastructure etc, and the problem of public sector pay. it gives him a little bit of ability to gives him a little bit of ability to give something, but what the as to what is, just as your figures suggest, corporation tax receipts have gone down. there are squeezes in profits. they may be a slowdown in the economy next year because of uncertainty over brexit. that must bea uncertainty over brexit. that must be a concern. you always have to keep on eye macro mode is coming in in the future. we have been talking about record retail sales this week. that may help to boost vat. even
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retail sales are a worry in the sense that there are, of course, —— they are not necessarily seasonally adjusted. some have been reasonably good one month, not so good the next. the consumer is being squeezed a nyway next. the consumer is being squeezed anyway because of higher inflation and lower growth in wages than the inflation rate. we can't guarantee that type of revenue will be continuing in the future. the deficit is falling but the debt, the amount of money we owe as a country, is getting bigger. that has to be at the back of his mind as well, hasn't it? absolutely. we are borrowing £1.8 trillion. that is quite a large sum. that means the figure has gone up sum. that means the figure has gone up of gdp. that is very significant. he clearly has a problem with that. if you want to carry on borrowing,
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eve ryo ne if you want to carry on borrowing, everyone who looks at lending to you will be quite concerned about one's credit rating for the future. and of course since we still have deficits, we keep on borrowing rather than reducing that amount. that is a serious issue. if you look at trents, we are likely to see the deficit being reduced in the next few trends. the real concern is what will happen to public services. would he have enough room to relax? there is a so many departments it suggests that he won't be, because of the big debt, be able to say anything in this budget. but he will allow, slowly and gradually, the deficit to increase to meet the needs of the economy. i am quite convinced he will do it by stealth rather than announcing anything major in november. one will be watching very closely. thank you. some stories to update you on.
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alphabet is on the board. the owner of google. it has announced it would pay over $1 billion to buy htc, the smartphone operator. it is a taiwanese form. google has now bought it. its shares up accordingly. yesterday we had news from the federal reserve, ringing down as stimulus process. —— bringing down. the dowjones is currently up about a fifth so far. more from me later. thank you. three years after prince harry founded the invictus games, the uk's biggest team yet is preparing to fly to canada to compete in this year's event. tim muffett has been to meet them. the third invictus games gets under way on saturday in toronto. 90 members of the british team are here
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at heathrow checking in. joanne, you have previously taken part in 2014. what was it like? it was fantastic. i don't think anyone had an idea of the magnitude of the games and how big it was going to get, and how big it would be this time around. what impact as it had on you? the impact has been 100% positive for me. i have been able to channel where to focus. i'm taking part in five this year. swimming, golf, shot put, discus... have a good journey. craig, you took part in florida. what impact did it have on you? an amazing impact. iwas what impact did it have on you? an amazing impact. i was going through some dark times. you don't feel like you are able to do what you think you are able to do what you think you were able to do before, but getting into a sport and one thing
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that drives and push again in your life, it's inspiring in itself. you we re life, it's inspiring in itself. you were injured in 2011?|j life, it's inspiring in itself. you were injured in 2011? i was. life, it's inspiring in itself. you were injured in 2011? iwas. iwas life, it's inspiring in itself. you were injured in 2011? i was. i was a searcher. my role was to search for ieds and dispose of them. unfortunately, i was badly injured. lost both my legs, finger injury, shoulder injury. a few other bits. still here. pushing forward. you got to thank your lucky stars at the end of the day. you won silver last time, gold this time? definitely. gareth, you took part last year as well. what was it like? it was huge. absolutely phenomenal. i think we've done it really well and the americans tried to better it. they'd done absolutely a really good job of trying to better it. what event are you taking part in? the artery and the driving. best of luck. --
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archery. bring back a medal. the sporting action begins on saturday in toronto. it is the biggest invictus games so far. for these 90 uk athletes, the story begins now. the very best of luck. the headlines coming up on the bbc news channel. ina coming up on the bbc news channel. in a moment, we say goodbye to viewers on bbc two. first, the weather. good morning. many of us started with sunshine this morning. it was in western areas we saw heavy rain first thing. this was one scene in shropshire. you can see the area of rain on the radar moving gradually eased. but as that rain cleared away from dumfries and galloway, we have had some sunshine coming through. thanks to our weather watcher. that rain is going to continue to move east. very
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sporadically. ahead of it we will see some trier, brighter weather across east anglia and the south—east. but behind this area of rain, behind this cold front, it will turn much fresher. across western scotland there will be some sunny spells with the odd shower, temperatures dropping a few deg. some heavy showers in northern ireland, which could turn thundery later. still quite cloudy across northern england, into central and southern areas. the far east staying dry. the cloud increasing. the cloud disappearing across wales and the south west england. the cold front is going to move away east through this evening and tonight. with a little ridge of high—pressure moving in, that will clear the clouds. with clear skies it will turn chilly compared to last night. these —— these are the temperatures in towns and cities. more rain in northern ireland in the early part of friday.
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that rain gradually spreads to scotland. patchy rain in north—west england, wales and the south—west. for the bulk of england and wales it should remain dry into the afternoon with some sunny spells. temperatures 17 to 19 degrees. for the weekend, high—pressure situated towards the east. low—pressure, quite a deep area of low pressure, the west. the isobars really squeezed. we will see quite a strong wind across western areas. the rain should hold off until much later in the day. for most on saturday will be dry with a bright sunny spells. feeling quite pleasant. temperatures 18 to 20 celsius. by sunday, that rain will move it further east. —— moved. quite warm in the east. temperatures at upton 19 21 celsius. more details on the website. that is all from me. this is bbc news and these are the
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top stories developing at midday. are you fully behind the prime minister's speech? the cabinet meets do agree it's brexit strategy ahead ofa do agree it's brexit strategy ahead of a major speech by the prime minister in italy tomorrow. we are live in downing street where that meeting has now been going on for two hours. rescue workers in mexico city work around the clock to free children trapped in the rubble of a collapsed primary school. the ryanair boss collapsed primary school. the rya nair boss michael collapsed primary school. the ryanair boss michael o'leary admits significant management failure, but warns pilots not to misbehave. puerto rico cut off without power, after the island was battered by hurricane maria. also, the fa under fire for its handling of allegations surrounding mark sampson. the england women's manager was sacked over claims of inappropriate behaviour detailed in a report to his bosses two years ago. and three
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yea rs his bosses two years ago. and three years after prince harry founded the invictus games, the uk's biggest tea m invictus games, the uk's biggest team yet is flying to canada to compete. hello, a very good afternoon to you, it is thursday 21st of september. welcome to bbc newsroom live. theresa may is chairing a meeting of her cabinet in downing street to discuss the major speech on brexit, which she will deliver in italy tomorrow. the prime minister has insisted the government is working together to get the best deal for britain, despite the foreign secretary setting out his own vision for brexit in the recent newspaper article. our political correspondent chris mason is in downing street. they have been in there for two
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hours, what is going on and what does it mean? if only we knew what was going on, is the blunt honesty here. what we do know is that rather a lot seems to be going on, because meetings of the cabinet don't tend to last this long. as you say, it is now heading into its third hour. what we do know is that not everyone around the cabinet table prior to this meeting this morning had seen the full text of the prime minister's speech that she will deliver in florence tomorrow. yes, a d raft had deliver in florence tomorrow. yes, a draft had been circulating for around a week. when that boris johnson had seen a draft, prior to committing quite a lot of ink to the daily telegraph's paper last saturday. but we don't know any more than that. what we do know is that theresa may has a very trickyjob in squaring off her cabinet with what she is going to say tomorrow, whilst at the same time trying to say a sufficient amount that those in brussels and around the european union's capitals feel there is enough being done on the british side to try to ensure progress is being made in the talks was
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apologies rather immediate dash round as i heard the door open, it has not opened a vast amount in the last two hours, you can understand our excitement, even if it is not a cabinet minister who happens to be leaving. and it is vital for theresa may at the cabinet paints a picture of unity around her, at least until she delivers the speech tomorrow. yes, because every time there is an outbreak of a lack of unity, of which there have been rather a few in the last year or so, and over the summer, it is notjust a domestic audience that notices that. brussels is very keenly tuned to what is going on within westminster, and it sees these outbreaks of disagreement, and will often conclude perhaps that strengthens their hand because they can make the argument the british governor doesn't quite know exactly what it once. what have we learned? we have learned from one cabinet minister speaking to the bbc this morning that the prime minister wants to have an open and generous offer to
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the european union in this speech in florence. we don't know what that amounts to, but when you look at the numbers and start playing with those numbers, and you start thinking what is the uk have to say to try to ensure that some member states don't feel that financially they will lose out when the uk is a big net contributor leaves you dodt leaves the european union, that could mean, kurd, that the uk is paying around the order of £10 billion for perhaps a couple of years during some transition arrangement to ensure there is not a whole in the eu's budget. politically, theresa may needs to sell something like that, if that is what it amounts to, to the british electorate, while hoping that an offer like that is sufficient that there can be a movement on in the talks into the future relationship the uk has with the eu, rather than the things just on the table about uncoupling our existing relationship. thank you.
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rescuers in mexico are racing against the clock to find survivors, after the huge earthquake on tuesday, which caused widespread damage in the capital, mexico city, and the surrounding areas. at least 230 people were killed, including more than 20 children, who died when their primary school collapsed. 30 children are still missing and the death toll is expected to rise. the epicentre of the earthquake was in puebla state, about 75 coulomb to from the capital. the earthquake struck on the anniversary of mexico's worst ever quake in 1985, in which 10,000 people died. the president has declared three days of morning for the victims. our correspondent reports. after the horror of the earthquake, there is hope. these young children were pulled alive from a primary school
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in the south of mexico city. rescuers searched overnight for others who still may be trapped. at least 20 children were killed here. it was on tuesday lunchtime that the powerful earthquake struck mexico. as buildings collapsed, people ran for cover. across mexico city, the search for survivors is continuing. as you can see, people are going in to try and help with the efforts. this six—storey building in the distance is the focus of their work. this family's son, juan, was working in the building. he called his parents every day. the last spoke hours before the quake hit. for the past day, they have watched as rescuers picked through the rubble, but there are still no sign of him. and for the past day they have watched as rescuers picked through the rubble, but there is still no sign ofjuan.
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translation: we still believe he will make it out alive. i will dig him out myself if i can. i will dig him out myself if i could. relief workers have beenjoined by hundreds of volunteers. many have turned up with their own tools to do their bit. there are a lot of people under the buildings, that's the problem, lots of people are trapped under the buildings, and that is something, it is desperate, because nobody is helping you. at times, the crowd was asked to be silent so rescuers could call out to any survivors still stuck under the debris. more than 20 people have been rescued already from this building, but as time passes, the chances of people being reunited with their loved ones are becoming ever slimmer. and we can cross to red genie now, who is in mexico city for us. —— to
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rajiini. bring us up—to—date with his efforts to rescue the children trapped under the rubble of the school. the rescue effort across mexico city has been continuing through the night. we don't have an update on the fate of those children. rescuers are working to reach them. what we do know is that the rescue effort is continuing in earnest there. so too here at this apartment building that i mentioned in my report. wejust apartment building that i mentioned in my report. we just arrived apartment building that i mentioned in my report. wejust arrived here about half an hour ago and we saw a number of rescue workers leaving who had their shift for the night and new teams arriving. since we were last here, we have learned a further four people were rescued arrive humm alive. we also spoke to some rescue workers who had been at another building close to hear, and they said they had been working through
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the night. we asked, did you manage to pull anyone out of the rubble? they said yes, we did but u nfortu nately they said yes, we did but unfortunately they were already dead. we have been reporting mexico has been asking other countries for help with specialist equipment. how much is needed? the devastation not just here in mexico but across the country was severe “— just here in mexico but across the country was severe —— in mexico city. they need a lot of help. i don't know if you can see over my shoulder, but there are large cranes needed to help lift some of the daybreak away from the piles of rubble that are just left where buildings once stood. the other concern for rescuers here is whether further buildings will collapse, and so we have spoken to some before here who say that is another concern, that some of the structures we re concern, that some of the structures were damaged during the earthquake, and therefore there is the risk they could then collapse. indeed yesterday we saw hundreds of
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volu nteers yesterday we saw hundreds of volunteers who turned up here, many of them taking large planks of wood into the building behind me. and thatis into the building behind me. and that is so they can try to reinforce the structure, so that buildings where they believe people still may be trapped inside a live, can be reinforced, so there is a way they can actually get the people who may still be inside. presumably, the one, because of the fear of further colla pse one, because of the fear of further collapse and after—shocks, many people are sleeping outside? sylla yes, we only got it half an hour ago and one of the heartbreaking things about these natural disasters is just how many people are left without shelter. just across the street from where i am there is a hairdressing salon. as i walked past, dozens of people crammed some sleeping in the hairdressing chairs, others just on the floor. then there are dozens more having to make do with sleeping on the pavement overnight. not all of them are
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without shelter. some of them have come from other parts of max unger to find out about the fate of fellow ones, as we saw in that report, the worried parents of one young man who lived in this apartment building. one thing that is heartening is the number of volunteers who have tried to offer their support. this morning we have seen dozens of volunteers hand—out hot cups of tea ann coffey and other snacks and food to people who have been left without shelter here. of course officials here say they will not stop, their focus is still on the rescue effort but as the time passes on, the chances of finding people alive get ever smaller but people are not giving up hope right now. some breaking news coming into us that the former conservative mp, sir teddy taylor, has died. his family say, at the age of 80. sir teddy, who had been ill to some months,
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died in southend hospital they last night. his wife sheila said. he was of course known for his eurosceptic views. he had first entered parliament as mp for glasgow cathcart in 19 to the fore. then he quit as scottish minister over edward heath's decision to join what was then the common market. two decades later he was among a band of tory rebels who have the whip withdrawn and were kicked out of the party byjohn major over their opposition to the maastricht treaty. soa opposition to the maastricht treaty. so a eurosceptic throughout his political career. his wife said he never changed his views on europe and remained devoted to his constituency and its people. sir teddy taylor, who has died at the age of 80. the chief executive of ryanair, michael o'leary, has admitted that the firm is facing a
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significant management failure as it struggles to cope with thousands of flight struggles to cope with thousands of flight cancellations. the airline is now planning to make pilots defer some of their annual leave. speaking at the compa ny‘s some of their annual leave. speaking at the company's agm in dublin this morning, mr o'leary warned his pilots not to misbehave, and said some of his staff were being precious. let's go to our reporter, mike cartwright, at stansted airport. thank you very much and good afternoon to you. we have heard of the details of the numbers of flights being cancelled each day but just give us a sense of the disruption that is causing to would be ryanair disruption that is causing to would be rya nair passengers. disruption that is causing to would be ryanair passengers. 2100 flights until the end of october. that is around 315,000 passengers. just to give you a flavour of what it means here at stansted, this is ryanair‘s uk hub, 70% of the flights going out here are ryanair. it is a substantial airport. looking at the
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listings today, 19 flights have been cancelled here, coming in and out to places like marseille, luxembourg, lisbon, eindhoven, many, many more. clearly, if your flight has been cancelled, you are not going to be turning out here today, but we have been down there and had a chat with some ryanair passengers, just getting some feedback. passengers are talking about the stress they have been feeling, whether there flight have been feeling, whether there flight has been cancelled or not. some people are saying they are not going to fly ryanair ever again, but also talking to more pragmatic people, they say ryanair is cheap, they can get around europe for less money, and they will continue flying. but passengers who know their flights have been cancelled have been directed to the website of ryanair, where they can get a refund ora ryanair, where they can get a refund or a replacement flight but there has been some criticism from consumer groups, who say that compensation has not been mentioned
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by ryanairon compensation has not been mentioned by ryanair on the website and all passengers are entitled to it. also there is some news coming out in the newspapers today about passengers trying to rebook their flights, and having to repay for those little extras, like extra luggage allowance or legroom. the story is rumbling on and not going away any time soon for ryanair. thank you. with me now is captain tilman gabriel from the international pilot training association, also professor of aviation management at london city university. thank you very much for coming along. have you ever known a situation like this for an airline, certainly on this scale? we definitely had shortfalls of pilots before, and this is the key reason for the ryanair before, and this is the key reason for the rya nair trouble they before, and this is the key reason for the ryanair trouble they are going through. they should have been better prepared, longer prepared. ryanair is one of the basic training
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grounds for our new pilots. there area grounds for our new pilots. there are a low—cost carrier, pilots to wa nt to are a low—cost carrier, pilots to want to progress their career, go the long haul or larger aircraft, so their natural attrition was or was their natural attrition was or was the fact of their business. this is happening now and it was foreseeable. the cover pilot shortfall with what they did with vacation bands is a last resort. this has all been used in previous shortfalls as well that what we have here is an industry crisis, not a ryanair prices. do you think there isa ryanair prices. do you think there is a shortage of pilots generally and is this a problem particularly affecting ryanair? it is particularly affecting ryanair, because they have a huge need for new pilots. and the world needs pilots. we need another hundred
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thousand pilots in the next 20 yea rs. thousand pilots in the next 20 years. this is where i come as executive chairman of the aeronautic society, will speak and lead a team of experts to start covering that. it was recognisable about a year ago, that our industry is in need of another 35,000 aircraft in the next 20 years. that means people. the interest of the pilot profession u nfortu nately interest of the pilot profession unfortunately is not as big as 20 yea rs unfortunately is not as big as 20 years ago, but ryanair was, and unfortunately is not as big as 20 years ago, but ryanairwas, and is, one of the prime training grounds for new pilots. that they have not handled it in an earlier time is the problem michael o'leary has handled now. watcher they have done, in your opinion, to avert this crisis? much earlier the actions they are currently taking now, having a
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lesser flight schedule. you currently taking now, having a lesserflight schedule. you cannot fly more than you have pilots, because that will be always paid for by delays or cancellations, and that shows now how costly that is in ryanair. do you think the pilots employed by rya nair and ryanair. do you think the pilots employed by ryanair and their unions see this as a golden opportunity to use this as leverage to negotiate better terms and conditions, and how fardo better terms and conditions, and how far do you think they will succeed in that? we have this crisis in the us since last year, a lack of pilots, and the price tag per pilot is hugely going up, including extra players, bonus plays, including taking pilots now back what we had in the 80s and the 70s, that the airline is paying for part of the education and not the pilot himself will stop our education in the pilot profession is hugely expensive and hugely conflicts. £100,000 is a
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normal price tag for this repression, and if you don't make a decent amount of money, you are stuck with a high load of debt and a very small income. so these are things that are drastically changing now, not only because of ryanair but because of the world industry that needs urgent pilots. we wait to see how this particular situation with ryanair unfolds. how this particular situation with rya nair unfolds. tilman how this particular situation with ryanair unfolds. tilman gabriel, executive chairman of the national pilots training association, thank you very much. the headlines now and the time is 12:19pm. the cabinet is still meeting in downing street ahead of a major speech on brexit to be delivered by the prime minister in italy tomorrow. rescue teams in mexico city worked to free a number of people thought to be still alive under the rubble of a school, which collapsed in tuesday's earthquake. and as we have just been discussing, the chief executive of ryanair, michael o'leary, admits there have been significant management failures as the firm struggles to cope with thousands of flight calculation is.
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—— cancellations. time for some more sport and back to mp damian collins has called for an independent review into the verbal association's handling of the role and dismissal of the former england women's head coach, mark sanson. he was sacked yesterday for inappropriate and unacceptable behaviour with female players in a previous role. richard conway has more. it was later in 2015, october, that martin glenn, chief executive who had come into office during this time, was made aware of the existence of the report. he says his mistake was to take it on face value, that it was confidential and he could not read the contacts —— the contents. that was not until last wednesday that he went back in, having been informed by two anonymous people, that we should
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ta ke anonymous people, that we should take a look at this. he did, convened a board meeting and the board decided that mark sanson's contract should be dismissed because of the contents of this report. nothing illegal, no lawbreaking, but conduct at bristol academy that this report contains that the fa believed was unbecoming of an england head coach, and therefore he had to leave. if senior executives of the verbal association were aware of problems with mark sanson, they had received warnings and advice about his conduct and behaviour did not act upon that, their position becomes untenable. next month, we will have a hearing at a select committee where eni aluko will give evidence about her allegations. and we will be seeking to question senior fa executives about their handling of the whole affair. ryan cookson has lost the election for the uci presidency the frenchman, david lafata yon. cookson, who had beenin david lafata yon. cookson, who had been in charge since 2013, was
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beaten by 37 votes to eight in the contest to lead world governing cycling body. he becomes the first president to servejust cycling body. he becomes the first president to serve just one term. the west indies have won the toss and chose to bowl, but while the one—day squad goes from strength to strength, there remain huge questions over a number of places in the england batting line—up ahead of this winter's ashes tests. that is the reality. you want to go to australia knowing exactly what your best 11 is. i don't think we are quite there at the moment, although the guys who played this summer all showed lenses of what they were capable of. but a batting line—up doesn't guarantee anything. we went there in 2013—14 with a pretty settled batting line—up and got beaten 5—0. with a pretty settled batting line-up and got beaten 5-0. there are clouds overhead in nottingham, follow the action on radio five live's sports section. that is all
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from me, iwill live's sports section. that is all from me, i will be back with more at 1:30pm. detectives investigating last week's terror attack on a london underground train at parsons green tube station have arrested a sixth person. a 17—year—old boy was detained in fulton heath, south london, just after midnight. five other people in custody all men aged between 18 and 48 years old. matthew thomson is at southwark police station in london for us. tell us about the latest arrest, and about the general investigation. as you can see behind me, southwark police station, where we believe all six of the men so far arrested in this case are being held by police under section 41 of the terrorism act. that act allows police to arrest anyone suspected of acts of terrorism for an initial period of 48 hours, after which time they have two apply to the courts to have that extended for up to 14 days. we know in this case that police were granted the right to hold one of the
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men, who we believe to be a 21—year—old syrian man by the name of ya hya fa roukh 21—year—old syrian man by the name of yahya faroukh until today, at which point they have to be the charge him, release him or apply to have that period extended further. an 18—year—old iraqi man arrested on saturday, they can hold him until this saturday. since those arrests, both of which took place on saturday, police have made four further arrests. on tuesday, they arrested a 25 europe man in newport, south wales, and then on early wednesday morning, two further men in newport, a 30—year—old and a 48 brugman. this morning, police told us brugman. this morning, police told us they had arrested a 17—year—old boy in fulton heath. a police search on going at that address, which ta kes on going at that address, which takes the total amount to six addresses in total searched by police over, although only five of those are ongoing. important to note none of the men arrested so far in this case have been charged with any crime. given the nature of the detention and arrest powers i was describing, it could be several more days before we hear any more news on
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charges for up there may not be charges for up there may not be charges at all. you might remember after the manchester attacks more than 20 people were arrested, all of whom were subsequently released without charge. what police have described as a very fast moving investigation is still very much on going at this stage. thank you, matthew thomson. keith doyle is in thornton heath where police are continuing to search a property there. keith, bring us up—to—date with what has been happening. what i can tell you is a 17—year—old was arrested around midnight last night from the house behind me. neighbours said there was a large number of police here, some in plain clothes, some in what neighbours described as riot gear, and also police with dogs teams as well. one neighbour said the front door was taken off, lying in front outside and the man was arrested for stop what has happened this morning is that the police have a cordon around. it is a relatively small cordon, compared with what we saw over the weekend. then the last hour, they put this tent up outside,
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and we know that the anti—terrorist squad forensic teams are now investigating inside. we have seen them take out bags of clothing. in them take out bags of clothing. in the last few minutes, we have seen wheelie bins being taken into the tent behind me. at the back of house, a very overgrown garden, we have seen them going in there with sores, cutting down some of the overgrown greenery in the back garden there. and with shovels and spades —— we have seen them going in with saws. the neighbours around here are saying this is what they describe as a halfway house. they say it is a place for young men, mainly foreign men, people who the neighbours have said are not speaking english, and they may stay for weeks or months at a time. they say relatively young men, but quite a high turnover. they are also saying the police are well aware of this property, that they have made many calls here over the last year, including one day a police car was stationed all day outside the house for stop keith, thank you for that update. the caribbean island of puerto rico
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is without power, and under night—time curfew, as it struggles to deal with the aftermath of hurricane maria, the most powerful storm to hit the us territory in nearly a century. as maria moves away from puerto rico, the us national hurricane centre has given a warning that the storm could regain major hurricane status as its gets past the dominican republic and heads towards the bahamas. the entire island of puerto rico is also under flood entire island of puerto rico is also underflood warning, entire island of puerto rico is also under flood warning, with the storm predicted to dump over 50 centimetres of rain during the course of the next 24 hours. will grant is there. it turned out to be the most powerful storm to hit puerto rico in almost a century. and it really felt like that. all of the people hunkered down, whether it was in the shelter, in their homes, they would have heard the most incredible sound of the wind and rain lashing down. that lasted for several hours. what we are seeing now are the last
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vestiges of the storm as it makes its way off the territory of puerto rico and back out into the caribbean. there is an overnight curfew put in place by the governor. that'll be in place for several days partly to protect people from themselves. there are many accidents that can happen in the dark while the electricity is out. there are many electric cables down. expect widespread flooding for remote regions. thankfully, there have been no reports of large—scale loss of life. let's check out the weather forecast here, heading across to join chris fawkes for that. our weather is reasonable today, a skinny band of rain pushing its way eastwards, across the uk but it is a very slow—moving weather front to
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stop no real wind across the front to push it along. for much of the day, east anglia and south—east england dry, highs of 20, the rain arriving during the evening time, brighter skies working to the west with just a few isolated afternoon showers to watch out for. overnight tonight, the rain clears away from east anglia and south—east england. we are left with clear skies can will be a cooler night compared with recent nights, turning quite chilly in the countryside, then towards the end of the night, a band of rain moving into northern ireland. but in windy start the day here tomorrow. that pushes into parts of scotland, western pa rt of that pushes into parts of scotland, western part of in london wales, but through the afternoon will probably tend to weaken a bit, too, that lighter and patchy. central and eastern england staying dry with some sunny spells, again reasonably pleasant, and the sunshine coming out in northern ireland through friday. we can weather prospects not bad, sunny spells, reasonably warm but we do have a band of rain coming in on sunday. this is bbc news. the headlines: the cabinet is continuing to meet in
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downing street ahead of an important brexit speeds the prime minister with the liver in florence tomorrow. —— will deliver. rescue workers in mexico city continue to search for trapped children in the rubble of a collapsed primary school following tuesday's earthquake. ryanair boss michael o'leary has admitted to significant management failure as the airline cancels 40 to 50 flights a day for the next five to six weeks. a sixth person has been arrested in connection with the london tube bomb at an address in london. the whole of puerto rico has been left without power following the catastrophic damage caused by hurricane maria. former conservative mp sir teddy taylor has died at the age of 80. he opposed britain's membership of the european union and became a prominent parliamentary figure in the campaign against the maastricht treaty. three years after prince harry found the uk team is flying
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to canada to compete. theresa is “ dz speech boris own vision a there? yogi—555 55 5 there? yeah, . if: ,.- z ' "' there? yeah, ' . if: "f n ' there? yeah, i am if: ,.- z ' "' still in there? yeah, i am surprised. cabinet meetings do not tend to last this long. we don't
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know the specifics of what is being talked about around that table. but it is difficult not to speculate that when you are in the context of a meeting lasting this long, but clearly there is obviously substantial things that substantial people around the table want to say about the contents of what is accepted as a very substantial speech. there was a flurry of activity about 45 minutes ago when some of the drivers for the ministers talk up their positions behind the wheels of the various electric cars and the jaguars. but still, 45 minutes on from that, still, 45 minutes on from that, still no sign of them coming out. i think it does point, while obviously we don't know what is being talked about in specific terms, it does point to a substantial discussion. we were chatting earlier and i was asking you, we were discussing the point of whether theresa may will have presented the speech to the cabinet as a fait accompli or whether she was open to suggestions
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for changes. the length of this meeting would certainly suggest the latter might be happening? yes, it would. the implication had been that whilst ds, some cabinet ministers we re whilst ds, some cabinet ministers were feeling that the latest draft, if that is what it turned out to be... some had seen the drafting process go on for a recent weeks. the assumption was that would not be radical amendments made between now and when the speeches delivered tomorrow in florence. but you get some sense, notjust from the news coverage of the last week and those 4100 words boris johnson coverage of the last week and those 4100 words borisjohnson tend for the daily telegraph, as well as philip hammond... here we go. the cabinet meeting breaking up. are you all a nest of singing birds? that
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was the defence secretary, sir michael fallon, leaving downing street. that suggests the cabinet has now broken up. another card to my right, to your left, moving into position. —— car. more engines firing up. sir michael fallon... wrister greyling, have you signed of the speech? why did cabinet last so long? did you like what you saw? david gauke, the secretary of state for work and pensions. jeremy hunt, the health secretary. that was a long meeting, mr hunt? was it a bit of urbani here —— a barney? where you impressed with what you saw? so,
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thatis you impressed with what you saw? so, that is the life of a political correspondent on the morning of a cabinet meeting, shouting lots of vaguely inane questions and almost a lwa ys vaguely inane questions and almost always never getting much more than always never getting much more than a smile in response. pretty much all of the heavyweights have now left. no sign yet of borisjohnson. there may be some more departures. a car pulling up in front of the door. no, it has just paused outside number 11 instead. i make that two and a half hours. the meeting started just after ten o'clock this morning. i can't actually remember a cabinet meeting in the recent past that lasted as long as that one. i have tasked one of my colleagues back in the newsroom to cav can find out one that took longer. —— to see if. the newsroom to cav can find out one that took longer. -- to see if. the fa ct that took longer. -- to see if. the fact everybody has, crowd tight—lipped may suit theresa may
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ahead of the speech tomorrow. we just reported on the death of conservative mp sir teddy taylor, who quit as a scottish office minister in 1971, over edward heath's decision tojoin minister in 1971, over edward heath's decision to join what was then the common market. it underlines the decades of opposition, or the decades of angst, that the conservative party has gone through over whether it is going to support being a member of the block are not? yeah, absolutely. it really plays into that. when we reflect on the life of teddy taylor. it reflects how long the conversation has been going on, particularly in the conservative party, but the awkward relationship the uk has had with what is now the european union. that is now an awkwardness that predates the uk's membership in the early 19705. big smile, mrjohnson. did you get what you wanted ? big smile, mrjohnson. did you get
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what you wanted? is philip your new best friend? how come you had to meet for so long? yet morse shouted questions. quite striking, the choreography, that mr hammond and mrjohnson decided to depart together, given that in many senses they have personified the polar opposite views around the cabinet table about the flavour of brexit that we may enter up with. nick timothy, the former chief of staff to theresa may until the general election, had a pop at both mrjohnson and mr hammond thoroughgoing on manoeuvres, as he described it in a column in the daily telegraph today. —— firm going on. i apologise that i broke off from reflecting on sir teddy taylor's life to show that some cabinet ministers. his career and his career long opposition to the
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idea of european political integration speaks to how long the concern has been within conservative circles and beyond about the very awkward relationship with what is now the european union. he stood down, as you are saying, as a minister, a scottish office minister in the 19705, when ted heath was keen to take the uk into the european economic community. he became one of the witless wonders of the 19905 whenjohn major basically kicked out some of his own mps the 19905 whenjohn major basically kicked out some of his own mp5 from the parliamentary party because of their steadfast opposition to the maastricht treaty, which created the european union and set out the framework for the creation of the single currency euro. so whilst he will have cheered at the result of the referendum, teddy taylor, last year, his career and his lifelong opposition to european integration also speaks to how deep—seated the current rows that we see around the cabinet table are in a more broader,
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historical sense. chris, thank you very much. a real flurry of cabinet ministers leaving number10. as flurry of cabinet ministers leaving number 10. as chris was mentioning, as far as he can recollect, one of the longest cabinet meetings he can remember. doctors and relatives of patients with debilitating illnesses will no longer need a court ruling to withdraw life support treatment following a decision at the high court. it means if relatives and doctors agree and all medical guidelines are being observed, they will no longer have to go through a lengthy legal process to get permission. with me now is professorjenny kitson ‘s. with me now is professorjenny kitson '5. she is from cardiff university. i know you have done a lot of work with many families who face difficult decisions about their relatives. let me get straight to those families first of all. what
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has been the reaction from the people you work with? extremely positive. there is a very common feeling that difficult decisions are made in difficult circumstances. there are concerns over a moral and ethical lines being crossed, and the fear that a decision might be taken to end the life of a patient who doesn't want that to happen. this is about the best way of making sure we give personal care and the patient is at the centre of all decisions. the framework for that is the act from 2005 which lays out a good process. we all want to protect those rights. the question is whether court intervention has helped that. it would be much better
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to have done at the coal face with best interest decision—making. to have done at the coal face with best interest decision-making. how would it protect their lives better without the checks and balances of the court? the checks and balances that already exists is that you put the pillars in place of a good clinical assessment, a second opinion, a thorough discussion with family and friends about values and beliefs, and a good quality care package. what we are finding through research is that is in place and it is taking nine months, even up to three years, to get a case through the court. during that time treatment it has been given against the best interest of a patient. has a patient‘s condition of improved during that time while families and doctors have been waiting a decision from the court? ? doctors have been waiting a decision from the court?? there are some. it depends whether that improvement is significant to that person. for some individuals it wouldn't matter if they were in a vegetative state or merely conscious with the ability to
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occasionally feel things. their best interest remains the same. but to a point where family has said, we have changed our minds about thinking that ending someone's life is the right path to go down? of all the families i've researched over the last seven years, that has not been the case. thank you very much for coming along to talk to us about what is clearly a very difficult issue. 16 former army instructors are due to appear before a court martial charged with assaults on recruits. the group from the army foundation couegein the group from the army foundation college in harrogate are facing 40 charges, including actual bodily harm and battery. danjohnson is at the woolford court—martial‘s centre. what has been happening? there are 16 army instructors in total involved. the first ten of them
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appear —— appeared here this morning, charged with the abuse, assault, battery and ill—treatment of recruits. recruits who were just 16 or 17 years old at the time when they were going through the army foundation college training course in harrogate. but this abuse is actually alleged to have taken place ona training actually alleged to have taken place on a training camp in scotland, in the summer of 2014. it is alleged the summer of 2014. it is alleged the group of instructors punched recruits, dropped them from heights, spat on them, even forced their heads underwater and held them face down in mud. there is also an allegation that some instructors pushed manure, animal manure coming the faces of recruits, and even one young soldier was forced to eat animal manure. all the instructors who have appeared here today, the first ten involved in this case, have denied all the charges that they face. they have been told they will have to go through a full
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court—martial trial, which is expected to take place in february next year. the remaining six instructors who have been charged are due to appear here tomorrow morning. dan, thank you. a teenage follower of so—called islamic state which spread terrorist propaganda has been sentenced to four and a half years in prison. tara saying from slough was found guilty at the old bailey injuly of was found guilty at the old bailey in july of seven was found guilty at the old bailey injuly of seven charges of disseminating terror documents on youtube and whatsapp. a court heard he began sharing videos and audio files two years ago, attempting to justify the charlie hebdo and paris attacks, and offering advice to those contemplating going to syria. an inquest into the death of moors murderer ian brady has finally died of natural causes. the 79—year—old serial killer died at a secure
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hospital on merseyside in may. kate sweeting is at bootle town hall, where the proceedings have been taking place. it happened there today? the coroner, christopher sumner, concluded that brady died from heart failure, secondary to chronic lung disease. he had been a heavy smokerfrom much chronic lung disease. he had been a heavy smoker from much of his life. he died in may at the age of 79, at as hworth he died in may at the age of 79, at ashworth hospital, a psychiatric unit where he had been for more than 30 years. he had been on intermittent hunger strike since 1999, and force—fed from any of those years. a nasalfeeding 1999, and force—fed from any of those years. a nasal feeding tube was only removed in the days before he died. today at the inquest we heard from dr brian rogers, a home office pathologist, who carried out the postmortem. he found that brady's body was in good condition. he was not emaciated. he concluded the hunger strike had little effect on his death. he also heard —— we also heard from dr thomas, a
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co nsulta nt also heard from dr thomas, a consultant forensic psychologist, who told the coroner that brady had been accepting snacks and meals intermittently from different carers throughout his time at the hospital. nevertheless, brady had been fighting for many years to move to a prison in scotland, where he might be allowed to die. that request was never granted. it was expected that we may hear what has or will happen to brady's remains. the coroner said thatis to brady's remains. the coroner said that is down to brady's executor, his lawyer, currently on a religious holiday. the coroner had previously said that brady's ashes must not be scabbed —— scattered on saddleworth moor in greater manchester, which is where many of his and myra hindley‘s victims were buried. spain's prime minister has urged catalan separatists to respect the law as protests were held in barcelona. they were aimed at the national government's attempts to halt an independence referendum being lined up for1 october. tom burridge spoke
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to some of those taking part in the pro—independence demonstrations. there is a real sense of defiance here. these people were already angry at the spanish authorities, who have for years blocked attempts to hold a referendum on independence from spain in catalonia, but as of today, the sense of political tension here has moved up a gear. we just want to vote. it's not like we're calling for independence — like, i want independence — but i just want a vote. ijust feel that's our right. everyone, what do you think? yes, no, ok, let's do what we say. spain is not going to allow a vote, because they say it's illegal so what are you going to do? oh, i'm going to say, no, that is not illegal. we're going to do it anyway. i know the british government has let the scottish do that. i cannot understand how spain is not letting us do that. for much of the time here, it has been a carnival atmosphere. in the distance, beyond the crowd,
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in the economy ministry is the the devolved catalan government — it were raided by officers from spain's civil guard police, earlier, in a high—stakes manoeuvre by the spanish state, to try and prevent the referendum, which madrid says would be illegal, from taking place. police came and they wanted to arrest people. it's made a lot of noise. everybody is angry. everyone has had enough. it isjust a joke to me that they are calling democracy and illegal thing. they cannot stop us. even if they have the army, even if they have everything, they cannot stop us. i do not really care about the consequences any more. like, if i have to print my own papers, i don't care what i have to do. this crowd, though, is not representative of wider catalan society. opinion polls in the past have been inconclusive, when catalans have been asked whether or not they want an independent catalan state.
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despite the efforts of separatist parties, who run the devolved administration here, to force the spanish government's hand, we have now reached an uncomfortable and unpredictable stand off. tom burridge, bbc news, in barcelona. tougher penalties could be introduced first cyclist to injure or kill pedestrians, as part of an urgent review of all aspects of cycling safety. one idea being considered by the government is a new offence which is the equivalent of causing death by careless or dangerous driving. it follows a number of high—profile incidents involving cyclists colliding with pedestrians. do we need new laws to tackle irresponsible cyclists? joining me now is donncha mccarthy from the campaign group, stop killing cyclist. do you think this review is an over reaction, or is it timely? we don't object to laws
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tackling dangerous behaviour on the roads, whether by cyclists or drivers. we want the law to be proportionate to the danger posed. 5500 pedestrians have been killed by ca rs 5500 pedestrians have been killed by cars in the last five years. 31 by cyclists. the real danger comes from ca rs. cyclists. the real danger comes from cars. we want government action on that. there has been by parliament encouraging the comment to take action on road safety. they have done nothing. what needs to happen to improve road safety, specifically when it comes to pedestrians and cyclists ? when it comes to pedestrians and cyclists? the main thing is investment in cycling lanes. this government invests nothing compared to other countries. in infrastructure, we need to spend £3 billion per year. is it mandatory to have a bell at the moment? yes. so anybody who doesn't have one, really they should be picked up on that? anybody who doesn't have one, really
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they should be picked up on that7m is mandatory to have working brakes. the laws exist already to tackle these issues. it is true to say though that in the charlie austin case, that was an archaic law that had to be used to prosecute him. there needs to be some update there, doesn't there? the wording is archaic but the punishment is there. let's make it clear, there has been one death from a bike in 30 years. 40,000 people a year die from transport pollution, another 40 , 000 die from inactivity diseases. that is where we need government action. for the safety of all of us. are a cyclist in general being given a bad name because of this? look, there are bad eggs, whether pedestrians, cyclists are drivers. 30% of drivers break the law on speeding. that is far more dangerous than any cycling through a red light or on the
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pavement. if you're driving at 70 mph and you hit a child, they are gone. are cycling groups being consulted by the comment? we haven't been but we hope we will be. thank you. three years after prince harry founded the invictus games, the uk's biggest team yet is preparing to fly to canada to compete in this year's event. tim muffett has been to meet them. the third invictus games gets under way on saturday in toronto. 90 members of the british team are here at heathrow checking in. the adventure begins for them today. joanne, you have previously taken part in 2014. what was it like? it was fantastic. i don't think anyone had an idea of the magnitude of the games and how big it was going to get, and how big it would be this time around. what impact as it had on you? the impact has been 100% positive for me. i have been able to channel where to focus. i'm taking part in five this year.
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swimming, golf, shot put, discus... sitting volleyball. have a good journey. craig, you took part in florida. what impact did it have on you? an amazing impact. i was going through some dark times. you don't feel like you are able to do what you think you were able to do before, but getting into a sport and one thing that drives and push again in your life, it's inspiring in itself. you were injured in 2011? i was. i was a searcher. my role was to search for ieds and dispose of them. unfortunately, i was badly injured. lost both my legs, finger injury, shoulder injury. a few other bits. still here. pushing forward. you got to thank your lucky stars at the end of the day. you won silver last
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time, gold this time? definitely. best of luck. gareth, you took part last year as well. what was it like? it was huge. absolutely phenomenal. i think we've done it really well and the americans tried to better it. they'd done absolutely a really good job of trying to better it. what event are you taking part in? the archery and the driving. best of luck. bring back a medal. the sporting action begins on saturday in toronto. 17 nations taking part. it is the biggest invictus games so far. for these 90 uk athletes, the story begins now. the very best of luck. ina in a moment, the bbc news at one. first, the weather. hi there. the latest on hurricane
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maria. having completely cut off power supplies and caused damage to puerto rico, the eye of the stormers to the north of the dominican republic. hurricane force winds extend out to 60 miles. there would be battering the dominican republic today. hurricane force winds expected in the turks and caicos islands. then it spins out quite ha rmlessly into islands. then it spins out quite harmlessly into the atlantic. the next place it could affect land wise, maybe us. a lot of uncertainty. the remains of maria could be coming our way. for the moment, we have a slow—moving weather from across the uk. it is moving slowly because there is not much in the way of wind blowing across the front. the winds —— the wind blowing parallel to the front today. rain probably not reaching east anglia and the south—east until dark. sunshine in the west. some
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showers as well, especially for northern ireland. overnight tonight, it will be cooler compared to recent nights. turning quite chilly in the countryside. temperatures into single figures. the next band of rain coming into northern ireland. this area bring accompanied by strong winds. —— this area of rain. the rain will be, little bit lighter and increasingly patchy as we move through friday. not reaching central and eastern england. a decent day here. sunshine coming back out in northern ireland once again. what about your weekend weather? things not looking too bad. we will see some spells of sunshine and at times it will feel quite warm. but there is rain on the way for western areas for sunday. here's the chart for saturday. a band of rain approaching the north—west of the uk. a cloudy start to the day. some mist and fog. many will see spells of sunshine. when coming from the south. in the
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sunshine, temperatures into the low 205. by the time we get to sunday, this area of rain will affect western pa rt of this area of rain will affect western part of the uk. skies brightening in northern ireland and further east it should stay dry on sunday. temperatures potentially 21, 22 degrees. a race against time, as rescuers search for survivors of the mexico earthquake. emergency workers are trying to free children trapped under a collapsed school — a 13—year—old girl is among those thought to be alive beneath the debris. we're building kits with first aid things like alcohol and band aids, that kind of stuff so they can bring these things to the people that need it. we will be live in mexico city with the latest. also this lunchtime: theresa may is meeting her cabinet,
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in advance of her attempt to break the brexit deadlock, with a speech in italy tomorrow. ryanair says more flights may have to be cancelled, as the boss admits there's been a significant management failure at the airline.
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